Labour Market Bulletin - British Columbia: January 2021

This Labour Market Bulletin provides an analysis of Labour Force Survey results for the province of British Columbia (BC), including the regions of Northern BC, Vancouver Island and Coast, Lower Mainland, Thompson-Okanagan and the Kootenays.

Overview

The province's labour market continued to struggle under public health measures to contain the COVID-19 pandemic, and employment in British Columbia (B.C.) remained relatively unchanged between December and January. The slight increase in job growth was due to gains in full-time employment (+0.2%) being offset by losses in part-time employment (-0.3%). [1] Though the provincial labour market remains relatively resilient against the ongoing pandemic compared to other large provinces, employment remains well below (-1.7%) what it was a year ago. [2] To date, some industries have recovered from the impacts of the pandemic, while others continue to suffer.

The province's unemployment rate rose to 8.0% over the month, up from 7.2% in December. [3] In comparison, the national unemployment rate increased by 0.6 percentage points to 9.4% over the same period.

In spite of improved testing capacity, and greater use of personal protection equipment by the public, further restrictions from the provincial public health office are now in effect until further notice. [4] In addition, effective January 7, 2021 travellers are required to provide negative COVID-19 tests before flying into Canada. [5] The restriction on all non-essential travel through the Canada-U.S. border is in place until February 21. [6] At the time of writing this report, all non-essential travellers entering Canada through land borders will need to provide proof of a negative COVID-19 test effective February 15. [7] The decline in visitors is detrimental to B.C.'s tourism sector. [8]

British Columbia Monthly Labour Force Statistics
Seasonally Adjusted
Monthly Data
January 2021 December 2020 January 2020 Monthly Variation Yearly Variation
Number % Number %
Population 15 + ('000) 4,320.6 4,319.2 4,277.3 1.4 0.0 43.3 1.0
Labour Force ('000) 2,825.8 2,798.2 2,772.7 27.6 1.0 53.1 1.9
Employment ('000) 2,599.6 2,596.8 2,644.2 2.8 0.1 -44.6 -1.7
Full-Time ('000) 2,050.4 2,045.9 2,075.8 4.5 0.2 -25.4 -1.2
Part-Time ('000) 549.2 550.9 568.4 -1.7 -0.3 -19.2 -3.4
Unemployment ('000) 226.2 201.4 128.4 24.8 12.3 97.8 76.2
Unemployment Rate (%) 8.0 7.2 4.6 0.8 - 3.4 -
Participation Rate (%) 65.4 64.8 64.8 0.6 - 0.6 -
Employment Rate (%) 60.2 60.1 61.8 0.1 - -1.6 -

* Totals may not add due to rounding
Source: Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey - Table 14-10-0287, formerly CANSIM 282-0087

British Columbia Monthly Employment and Unemployment Rate
British Columbia monthly employment and unemployment rate. The data table for this graph is located below

Seasonally adjusted data
Source: Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey Table 14-10-0287

Show data table: British Columbia Monthly Employment and Unemployment Rate
British Columbia Monthly Employment and Unemployment Rate
Unemployment Rate (%) Employment ('000)
Jan-2019 4.8 2,649.2
Feb-2019 4.5 2,566.8
Mar-2019 4.7 2,666.9
Apr-2019 4.7 2,673.3
May-2019 4.3 2,687.7
Jun-2019 4.5 2,683.6
Jul-2019 4.5 2,675.0
Aug-2019 5.0 2,664.5
Sep-2019 4.9 2,653.7
Oct-2019 4.8 2,667.9
Nov-2019 5.1 2,650.9
Dec-2019 4.8 2,647.1
Jan-2020 4.6 2,644.2
Feb-2020 5.1 2,641.3
Mar-2020 7.2 2,506.1
Apr-2020 11.5 2,230.7
May-2020 13.4 2,272.6
Jun-2020 13.3 2,395.2
Jul-2020 11.2 2,460.6
Aug-2020 10.7 2,468.7
Sep-2020 8.6 2,528.8
Oct-2020 8.0 2,566.8
Nov-2020 7.3 2,595.4
Dec-2020 7.2 2,596.8
Jan-2021 8.0 2,599.6

The unemployment rate for B.C. youth (15 to 24 years) rose from 14.2% to 16.8% in January, as more youth joined the labour force (+6.3%), but less than half were able to find work. [9]

Current pandemic restrictions continue to create barriers for some women, particularly those between the ages of 15 to 24 years, as employment in retail and in food services remain depressed. Over the month, the unemployment rate for young women spiked by 7.1 percentage points to 20.3%. As restrictions remain in place, employment opportunities in the service sector and/or for primary childcare providers will be challenging. [10] Looking forward, the unemployment rate for youth will likely stay in the double-digits this year.

British Columbia Monthly Unemployment Rates, by Gender and Age
Seasonally Adjusted Data January 2021
(%)
December 2020
(%)
January 2020
(%)
Monthly Variation
(% points)
Yearly Variation
(% points)
Total 8.0 7.2 4.6 0.8 3.4
25 years and over 6.6 6.1 4.0 0.5 2.6
Men - 25 years and over 6.1 6.0 3.8 0.1 2.3
Women - 25 years and over 7.1 6.3 4.2 0.8 2.9
15 to 24 years 16.8 14.2 8.8 2.6 8.0
Men - 15 to 24 years 13.4 15.1 9.0 -1.7 4.4
Women - 15 to 24 years 20.3 13.2 8.5 7.1 11.8

* Totals may not add due to rounding
Source: Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey - Table 14-10-0287, formerly CANSIM 282-0087

Employment by industry

The province's goods producing sector lost 7,900 jobs (-1.6%) in January primarily due to job losses in agriculture (--5.8%), manufacturing (-1.5%), and construction (-0.7%). [11] Overall, employment in the goods sector has worsened, with 14,500 fewer workers (-2.9%) from a year ago. [12]

The construction industry remains sluggish, as it is employing 30,900 fewer workers (-12.4%) when compared to a year ago. [13] Based on the most recent December data, housing starts in B.C. were down 5% when compared to December 2019. [14] The value of building permits increased to over $1.5B (+6.9%) year-over-year in December, primarily as the value of commercial building permits increased by roughly $177M (+89.1%). [15]

While construction employment remains well below that of January 2020, the industry may recover over the long-term as several non-residential projects will be ramping up. For instance, demolition work is scheduled to begin soon in preparation for construction of the $1.72B Broadway Subway Project in Vancouver. [16]

Meanwhile, the workforce on five major industrial projects across northern B.C. are slowly staffing back up following public health orders in late December temporarily reducing the number of workers on site. The Site C hydro project (near Fort St. John), LNG Canada project (Kitimat), Coastal GasLink pipeline (Dawson Creek to Kitimat), Rio Tinto's aluminum smelter tunnel project (Kitimat) and Trans Mountain project (Edmonton, AB to Burnaby, B.C.) are permitted to increase their workforces gradually between January and the end of February, in an effort to contain COVID-19 transmission within capacity of the Northern Health Authority. [17]

In addition, the Trans Mountain project announced that it would be restarting work after a two-month shutdown due to several serious safety incidents. Roughly 7,000 workers will be returning to the project across Alberta and B.C. following rigorous safety training. Going forward the project will be subject to more thorough safety standards and inspections. [18]

The forestry sector continues to adapt to ongoing challenges, including U.S. trade tariffs and a shrinking timber supply. Lumber prices hit a historical high in September 2020, and at the end of January 2021, remained above prices from one year ago. Demand from the U.S. remains strong; a result of fewer pre-owned homes and consequently a significant increase in new housing builds.

Looking forward, forestry will benefit from the Forest Enhancement Society of BC allocating $3M in new grants to 15 different wood fibre projects across the province. The projects will allow about 250,000 cubic metres of post-harvest wood waste to be used in the production of pulp, wood pellets, electricity, and compost for soil remediation. [19]

Compared to January of 2020, B.C.'s services sector employment decreased by 30,200 jobs (-1.4%). The decline was largely due to significant losses in accommodation and food services (-12.8%) and wholesale and retail trade (-5.3%), both which employ people in predominantly face-to-face occupations that have been the most affected by public health measures to contain the pandemic. [20]

On a monthly basis, wholesale and retail trade continues to struggle, as employment declined slightly by 2,500 (-0.6%). Retailers continue to operate under restrictions , including the requirement that masks be worn in all indoor retail spaces. Yet, according to most recent data, retail trade sales continue to increase as the province reported over $8B in retail sales last November, well above the $5.7B in April 2020, when most stores were closed due to the pandemic. [21] As the pandemic drove consumers towards spending more time and money online, some bricks and mortar stores continue to either lay off staff or close permanently. [22] For instance, the Hudson Bay announced more than 600 employees will be laid off across Canada due to the pandemic. [23]

With reports of new cases of the more highly transmissible COVID-19 variants, the outlook for B.C.'s tourism sector remains grim for the new year, especially as non-essential interprovincial travel restrictions remain in place. [24] Furthermore, the Government of Canada announced that cruise vessels are now banned from Canadian waters until February 28, 2022 to help limit the spread of COVID-19. [25] The extension will be a blow to businesses in coastal communities that rely on tourism.

Recovery in the transportation industry continues to be held up by challenges in foreign and domestic air travel. WestJet and Air Canada announced further layoffs and flight reductions as a result of the new federal rules requiring COVID-19 testing before flying into Canada and in anticipation of further rules on international travel. [26], [27] , [28]

At the time of writing this report, Air Canada announced that it would soon be temporarily laying off around 1,500 unionized workers and an unspecified number of management positions across Canada due to new travel restrictions and a decline in demand for flights. [29] As the two airlines reduce operations across the country, it is unclear at this time how many employees in B.C. are affected.

British Columbia Monthly Labour Force Statistics, by Industry
Seasonally Adjusted
Data ('000)
January 2021 December 2020 January 2020 Monthly Variation Yearly Variation
Number % Number %
Total employed, all industries 2,599.6 2,596.8 2,644.2 2.8 0.1 -44.6 -1.7
Goods-producing sector 490.2 498.1 504.7 -7.9 -1.6 -14.5 -2.9
Agriculture 25.0 30.8 28.7 -5.8 -18.8 -3.7 -12.9
Forestry, fishing, mining, quarrying, oil and gas 50.3 50.1 44.2 0.2 0.4 6.1 13.8
Utilities 20.4 18.5 12.9 1.9 10.3 7.5 58.1
Construction 218.9 220.4 249.8 -1.5 -0.7 -30.9 -12.4
Manufacturing 175.6 178.3 169.1 -2.7 -1.5 6.5 3.8
Services-producing sector 2,109.4 2,098.7 2,139.6 10.7 0.5 -30.2 -1.4
Trade 383.2 385.7 404.5 -2.5 -0.6 -21.3 -5.3
Transportation and warehousing 139.0 139.9 145.1 -0.9 -0.6 -6.1 -4.2
Finance, insurance, real estate and leasing 160.5 161.4 173.2 -0.9 -0.6 -12.7 -7.3
Professional, scientific and technical services 250.4 240.3 225.6 10.1 4.2 24.8 11.0
Business, building and other support services 109.4 110.7 110.6 -1.3 -1.2 -1.2 -1.1
Educational services 182.9 190.6 185.0 -7.7 -4.0 -2.1 -1.1
Health care and social assistance 341.0 337.2 329.8 3.8 1.1 11.2 3.4
Information, culture and recreation 126.6 116.4 126.9 10.2 8.8 -0.3 -0.2
Accommodation and food services 174.8 182.4 200.5 -7.6 -4.2 -25.7 -12.8
Other services 106.4 103.6 121.9 2.8 2.7 -15.5 -12.7
Public administration 135.3 130.4 116.3 4.9 3.8 19.0 16.3

* Totals may not add due to rounding
Source: Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey - Table 14-10-0355, formerly CANSIM 282-0088

Regional Analysis

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic remains widespread, yet employment in some regions are recovering. At this time, 52,900 jobs were lost are in the most populated Lower Mainland - Southwest region (-3.1%), when compared to the same time last year. [30]

British Columbia Monthly Labour Force Statistics, by Economic Region
3-Month Moving Averages
Seasonally Unadjusted Data
Employment Unemployment Rate
January 2021
('000)
January 2020
('000)
Yearly Variation
(%)
January 2021
(%)
January 2020
(%)
Yearly Variation
(% points)
British Columbia 2,579.2 2,630.8 -2.0 7.4 4.8 2.6
Economic Regions
Vancouver Island and Coast 401.7 402.1 -0.1 7.1 5.1 2.0
Lower Mainland - Southwest 1,644.7 1,697.6 -3.1 7.5 4.5 3.0
Thompson - Okanagan 289.9 287.4 0.9 7.4 5.6 1.8
Kootenay 75.8 78.3 -3.2 7.2 4.4 2.8
Cariboo 84.9 83.5 1.7 8.8 7.5 1.3
North Coast and Nechako 42.1 42.9 -1.9 6.3 3.6 2.7
Northeast 40.1 39.0 2.8 4.1 4.2 -0.1

* Totals may not add due to rounding
Source: Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey - Table 14-10-0387, formerly CANSIM 282-0122

Year-over-year, employment remained relatively unchanged in Vancouver Island and Coast. The unemployment rate is 7.1%, up from 5.1% one year ago. Looking forward, health care services across the region will improve once a $6.25M redevelopment to the emergency department at Port Alberni's West Coast General Hospital is completed in summer 2022. [31] In addition, construction has begun on the new intensive care unit (ICU) at Nanaimo Regional Hospital and is expected to create 200 direct jobs. [32]

The outlook for the region's tourism sector remains dire as non-essential travel restrictions continue to affect ferry travel. As well, many communities such as Victoria will continue to suffer following the cancellation of the Canadian cruise season until February 2022. [33] As such, the region's accommodation and food industry will likely face a challenging year without the thousands of tourists that would normally visit.

Employment in Lower Mainland - Southwest decreased by 3.1% compared to January 2020 and the unemployment rate increased to 7.5%. The region's construction industry is expected to benefit from the province of B.C. investing in $31.2M for seismic upgrades to two schools in Richmond. Construction will begin in 2022 and is scheduled to finish mid-2023. [34] The provincial government is also providing $24.7M for the construction of Eagle Mountain Elementary school in Abbotsford. The new 460-seat school will also feature a childcare centre with nearly 100 spots to provide before and after-school care. [35]

Meanwhile, construction of a replacement electrical substation by BC Hydro in North Vancouver will begin this March. [36] The project is expected to take around three years to complete and cost up to $100M. [37]

Thompson-Okanagan employment increased by 0.9% over the past year. [38] The City of West Kelowna has awarded a design contract to Johnston Davidson Architecture to design the new $18M city hall and library building. [39] Construction of the new building is set to begin later this year. [40] Looking forward, the province of B.C. is providing $34.8M for the construction of a new elementary school in Kamloops. Construction of the new 510-seat school is expected to begin in summer 2022. [41]

Despite the pandemic, the North Coast and Nechako region employment remained relatively unchanged due in part to ongoing megaprojects. The unemployment rate in January was 6.3%, up from 2.7% over the same period. The LNG Canada construction project continues to make progress, despite the COVID-19 public health order limiting the workforce in January. [42]

Meanwhile, the province of B.C. is providing $25M towards the expansion of the Port of Prince Rupert. In addition to other public and private funding, a new 28-hectare transload platform will be created, including the installation of new rail tracks and storage facilities. Once complete, the project is expected to create 200 jobs in transloading, and an additional 2,000 jobs in transportation and warehousing. [43]

Year-over-year, employment in Northeast increased slightly (+2.8%) despite the ongoing pressures of the pandemic. The unemployment rate (4.1%) is nearly identical to that of January 2020 (4.2%), and is the lowest in B.C. Although construction continues on BC Hydro's Site C hydroelectric project, albeit slowly under the public health order, the future of the project is uncertain. The project will undergo a yet unscheduled provincial cabinet review due to growing concerns over the project's cost overruns and schedule delays. [44]

Note

In preparing this document, the authors have taken care to provide clients with labour market information that is timely and accurate at the time of publication. Since labour market conditions are dynamic, some of the information presented here may have changed since this document was published. Users are encouraged to also refer to other sources for additional information on the local economy and labour market. Information contained in this document does not necessarily reflect official policies of Employment and Social Development Canada.

Prepared by: Labour Market Information (LMI) Directorate, Service Canada, British Columbia
For further information, please contact the LMI team.
For information on the Labour Force Survey, please visit the Statistics Canada website.

Footnotes

  1. Statistics Canada. Table 14-10-0287-01 Labour force characteristics, monthly, seasonally adjusted and trend-cycle, last 5 months, February 5, 2021 https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=1410028701

  2. Statistics Canada. Table 14-10-0287-01 Labour force characteristics, monthly, seasonally adjusted and trend-cycle, last 5 months, February 5, 2021 https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=1410028701

  3. Statistics Canada.  Table 14-10-0287-01 Labour force characteristics, monthly, seasonally adjusted and trend-cycle, last 5 months, February 5, 2021 https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=1410028701

  4. Province-wide restrictions, B.C.'s response to COVID-19, Government of British Columbia, February 5, 2021

    https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/safety/emergency-preparedness-response-recovery/covid-19-provincial-support/restrictions

  5. Tyler Jadah, Canada's mandatory air travel COVID-19 testing goes into effect next week, January 1, 2021 https://dailyhive.com/vancouver/canada-air-travel-covid-19-testing

  6. Brookyn Neustaeter, Canada-U.S. land border closure extended to Feb. 21, CTV News Online, January 12, 2021 https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/canada-u-s-land-border-closure-extended-to-feb-21-1.5263467

  7. Catharine Tunney, Negative COVID-19 test will soon be required at land border: Trudeau, CBC News online, February 9 2021 https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/negative-test-land-1.5906962

  8. SIGNALS AND SENTIMENT DASHBOARD, COVID-19, DESTINATION BRITISH COLUMBIA, February 7, 2021 https://www.destinationbc.ca/covid-19/destination-bc-response/signals-sentiment-dashboard/

  9. Statistics Canada. Table 14-10-0287-01 Labour force characteristics, monthly, seasonally adjusted and trend-cycle, last 5months, February 5, 2021 https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=1410028701

  10. Women in B.C. have fared worse than men during the pandemic, study finds, CBC News online, November 27, 2020 https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/covid-19-pandemic-women-report-1.5816266

  11. Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey - Table 14-10-0355, formerly CANSIM 282-0088, February 5, 2021 https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=1410035501

  12. Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey - Table 14-10-0355, formerly CANSIM 282-0088, February 5, 2021 https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=1410035501

  13. Statistics Canada Labour Force Survey - Table 14-10-0355, formerly CANSIM 282-0088, February 5, 2021 https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=1410035501

  14. Statistics Canada. Table 34-10-0156-01 Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, housing starts in all centres 10,000 and over, Canada, provinces, and census metropolitan areas, seasonally adjusted at annual rates, monthly (x 1,000), February 5, 2021 https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=3410015601

  15. Statistics Canada. Table 34-10-0066-01 Building permits, by type of structure and type of work (x 1,000), February 5, 2021 https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=3410006601

  16. Richard Zussman, B.C. government set to tear down buildings to clear way for Broadway Subway project, Global News online, February 2, 2021 https://globalnews.ca/news/7614878/bc-government-update-broadway-subway-project/

  17. Chad Pawson, B.C. health order restricts number of workers at large industrial work sites, CBC News online, January 4, 2021 https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/bc-health-order-workers-1.5860331

  18. David Thurton, Trans Mountain expansion resumes after long shutdown, CBC News online, February 8, 2021 https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/trans-mountain-tmx-pipeline-1.5905797

  19. New grants to help use more wood fibre, BC Gov News, Government of British Columbia, February 1, 2021 https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2021FLNRO0007-000157

  20. Statistics Canada.  Table  14-10-0355-01 Employment by industry, monthly, seasonally adjusted and unadjusted, and trend-cycle, last 5 months (x 1,000), February 7 ,2021 https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=1410035501

  21. Statistics Canada. Table 20-10-0008-01 Retail trade sales by province and territory (x 1,000) February 7, 2021 https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=2010000801

  22. Canadians spend more money and time online during pandemic and over two-fifths report a cyber incident, The Daily, Statistics Canada, October 14, 2020 https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/daily-quotidien/201014/dq201014a-eng.htm

  23. The Canadian Press, Hudson's Bay permanently laying off more than 600 workers across Canada, BNN Bloomberg Online, January 29, 2021 https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/hudson-s-bay-permanently-laying-off-more-than-600-workers-across-canada-1.1556373

  24. Province-wide restrictions, Travel advisory, Government of British Columbia, February 7, 2021 https://www2.gov.bc.ca/gov/content/safety/emergency-preparedness-response-recovery/covid-19-provincial-support/restrictions

  25. Government of Canada announces one-year ban for pleasure craft and cruise vessels, Transport Canada, Government of Canada online, February 4, 2021 https://www.canada.ca/en/transport-canada/news/2021/02/government-of-canada-announces-one-year-ban-for-pleasure-craft-and-cruise-vessels.html

  26. Pete Evens, WestJet cutting jobs and slashing flight capacity by 1/3, CBC News online, January 8, 2021 https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/westjet-cuts-1.5866018

  27. Air Canada cutting about 1,700 jobs as it reduces capacity in response to pandemic restrictions, CBC News online, January 14, 2021 https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/air-canada-job-cuts-1.5871301

  28. Sophia Harris, Why $2,000 for a hotel quarantine? Your questions about Ottawa's new travel rules answered, CBC News online, February 7, 2021 https://www.cbc.ca/news/business/2-000-hotel-quarantine-travel-covid-19-questions-1.5904275

  29. The Canadian Press, Jon Victor, Air Canada to temporarily cut 1,500 jobs, suspend 17 routes, BNN Bloomberg, February 9, 2021 https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/air-canada-to-temporarily-cut-1-500-jobs-suspend-17-routes-1.1561264

  30. Statistics Canada.  Table  14-10-0293-01   Labour force characteristics by economic region, three-month moving average, unadjusted for seasonality, last 5 months, February 8, 2021 https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=1410029301

  31. Expanding West Coast General Hospital's emergency department, BC Gov News, Government of British Columbia, January 15, 2021 https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2021HLTH0002-000057

  32. New Nanaimo ICU breaks ground to improve care, BC Gov News, Government of British Columbia, February 2, 2021 https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2021HLTH0027-000189

  33. Government of Canada announces one-year ban for pleasure craft and cruise vessels, Transport Canada, Government of Canada online, February 4, 2021 https://www.canada.ca/en/transport-canada/news/2021/02/government-of-canada-announces-one-year-ban-for-pleasure-craft-and-cruise-vessels.html

  34. More Richmond students will learn in seismically safer schools, BC Gov News, Government of British Columbia, January 21, 2021 https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2021EDUC0004-000087

  35. New school, child care spaces coming for Abbotsford families, BC Gov News, Government of British Columbia, January 26, 2021 https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2021EDUC0006-000133

  36. Capilano Substation, Projects & operations, BC Hydro Power Smart, February 8, 2021 https://www.bchydro.com/energy-in-bc/projects/capilano.html

  37. Brent Richter, Major Hydro infrastructure project coming to North Van's Murdo Frazer Park, north shore news, January 25, 2021 https://www.nsnews.com/local-news/major-hydro-infrastructure-project-coming-to-north-vans-murdo-frazer-park-3285711

  38. Statistics Canada.  Table  14-10-0293-01   Labour force characteristics by economic region, three-month moving average, unadjusted for seasonality, last 5 months, February 8, 2021 https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=1410029301

  39. Twila Amato, West Kelowna chooses architect for new city hall, library, Kelowna Capital News, January 27, 2021 https://www.kelownacapnews.com/news/west-kelowna-chooses-architect-for-new-city-hall-library/

  40. City Hall/Library Building Concept (January 2021), City Hall Project, City of West Kelowna, February 8, 2021 https://www.westkelownacity.ca/en/our-community/city-hall-project.aspx

  41. New, larger school for Kamloops students, community, BC Gov News, Government of British Columbia, January 25, 2021 https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2021EDUC0005-000121

  42. Vince Kenny, Berni Molz, A new year update from the LNG Canada Project site, News, LNG Canada, January 7, 2020 https://www.lngcanada.ca/news/a-new-year-update-from-the-lng-canada-project-site/

  43. Port Investment to create jobs, spark economic recovery, BC Gov News, Government of British Columbia, January 14, 2021 https://news.gov.bc.ca/releases/2021TRAN0008-000043

  44. Derrick Penner, Site C dam construction takes staged return to work while cabinet ponders project fate, Vancovuer Sun online, January 10, 2021 https://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/site-c-dam-construction-takes-staged-return-to-work-while-cabinet-ponders-project-fate

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